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Author Topic: Pizza Stone  (Read 2143 times)

rbogle

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Re: Pizza Stone
« Reply #3 on: July 31, 2015, 07:47:21 PM »

I used a kiln shelf for years as a pizza stone.  They worked perfectly.  Then I found a method of making pizza using a cast iron frying pan and now the kiln shelf is back to being a kiln shelf.

Paul

rbogle

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Re: Pizza Stone
« Reply #2 on: July 31, 2015, 07:46:54 PM »

take one of your older electric kiln shelves...one that will fit into your
oven.  place it on the shelf.  use it.   when it gets sorta grubby and
oil/stained, burned...just us it in your kiln for one firing.
looks new again.
it will last for years.
mel
and, i would never make one for me, or a friend...liability is
not worth it.  and, don't use one covered in kiln wash...geez.

rbogle

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Pizza Stone
« Reply #1 on: July 31, 2015, 07:46:09 PM »

I glazed the pizza stone I made. I wanted to be able to completely clean the stone after using. As for unglazed….. King Arthur Flour Baker’s Store offers pizza stones and advice. KAF says to put a piece of parchment paper on the stone, then put the pizza on top of the parchment paper. It’s kind of a drag when you have to chip your pizza off of a pizza stone. The point of the stone is to supply even heat to the bottom of the pizza.

While we’re on the subject. Alton Brown (Food Network) says to have unglazed tiles in your oven to help hold the heat. The idea being, if you preheat the oven - which you need to do if you are baking something - as soon as you open the oven door to put the raw baked good into the oven, all the heat comes out and the temperature in the oven drops dramatically. The tiles don’t lose heat (or very little heat is lost) when the oven door is opened. And so I went and made myself a nice slab of ^10, used my stamps to make moderate texture, and glazed it. Works great. I glazed it because I wanted to be able to wash the slab when food went exploring in the oven. Food does that sometimes.

Deb Thuman
debthuman@zianet.com