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Author Topic: slave to your clay - mel  (Read 3343 times)

rbogle

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Re: slave to your clay - mel
« Reply #7 on: September 02, 2015, 10:46:04 AM »

Hi...Just wanted to let you know that this discussion is one that I copied from the clayart email list when I was testing the forum and to show Mel how things would look/operate so I'm not sure he is monitoring it?  You'll note that I posted all the items. 

I'm not sure what areas he monitors but you might want to post your question to the general discussion area or you can send him a private message via the forum. His username is melpots

Hopefully that makes sense?

Ray

bsalab714

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Re: slave to your clay - mel
« Reply #6 on: September 02, 2015, 10:32:01 AM »

Please explain: what is a cross slab lift system that you mention in sushi plate technique/method?
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rbogle

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Re: slave to your clay - mel
« Reply #5 on: July 31, 2015, 07:42:51 PM »

Hi Daryl,

If adding vinegar to sand produces effervescence then you have calcium present - that makes that sand useless for pottery.

I agree that crushed silica would be the better material. Just be aware that fine crushed (means sharp edges) silica - is the stuff that causes silicosis. Best to keep that out of your lungs and studio.

RR

rbogle

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Re: slave to your clay - mel
« Reply #4 on: July 31, 2015, 07:42:16 PM »

YOU CAN TEST THE CONCRETE SAND & COMPARE WITH BEACH SAND in your clay but be sure & wash the beach sand, it's got salt with it! TEST TEST! MIKE GORDON

rbogle

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Re: slave to your clay - mel
« Reply #3 on: July 31, 2015, 07:41:41 PM »

When you add sand to clay can you use beach sand that has been screened ? Or do you glacé to wash it first and dry it? I am making my own clay in Mexico and cannot find grog. The sand I can find is basically for concrete. Suggestions?
Daryl

rbogle

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Re: slave to your clay - mel
« Reply #2 on: July 31, 2015, 07:41:09 PM »

Mel’s clay thoughts and my opinions: 

 Yes, each clay is different and each clay has advantages and disadvantages. NM Clay has a wonderful clay for making large sculptures. It’s great. Try to throw with it and you will need a skin graft.  Clay not being a one-size-fits-all kind of thing is why I don’t stick to just one type of clay or even one cone. Why fight the clay trying to make it do what it’s not capable of doing?

 We all come at clay from different perspectives and each perspective has value. I don’t throw. I love to hand build. There are a good number of folks on this list who don’t hand build but love to throw. Some mix their own clay. Some buy ready made clay. Both are good choices. Which is the better choice depends on what one wants to do with the clay.

As for porcelain….. Personally, I don’t find it hard to work with. Then again, I don’t try to get porcelain to do something it’s not going to do without a lot of alteration. There are other clay bodies that will do what porcelain won’t.

If there are 700 toys in the toy box, why play with only one toy?

Deb Thuman
debthuman@zianet.com

rbogle

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slave to your clay - mel
« Reply #1 on: July 29, 2015, 10:26:08 AM »

if you pick a certain commercial clay body as your basic every day
body...well, you become a slave to that body.  it will only
do so much, it will have limits, it will not do all, all the time.

it is one of the problems of `ready made` clay.
in fact there is another problem, in most cases you
do not even know what is in the body...secret of the
maker.

it is why i always encourage serious potters/artists to buy
a pug mill.  (it is not a frill, and as you age it will pay for
itself a thousand times...plus you never throw away clay...ever.
(and time saving, work saving tools are never frills.)

listening to the problems of warping porcelain sort of is the reason
i am writing this post.

if i had that body to work with, and was going to make
big platters...well, the first thing i would do is open the body
a bit.  a clean small particle sized silica sand would be added.
it would still be porcelain, but much easier to work with.  and
there are some very nice porcelain grogs can be used that
would enhance the workability of the clay.

it sure could be wedged in, or slam and cut layers with
added sand, but a pug mill would make fast work of it.

i had a lot of scrap around the studio, plus a trailer full
from the farm and hay creek...so, made a lot of throwing
clay the last two days.

it was a mixture of cone 10 clays.  even some industrial clay
that tim brought in his truck.  it is all basic stoneware.
mixed in will be an ideal stoneware.
i add silica sand, fine grog, ochre, and lake superior sand.
after a few hours it is my standard speckled body.  no one
could even guess that it is not my standard...that is my standard.
mixed multi stoneware clays.  and, as i say a thousand times...it
is `my` clay body...not some clay companies body.

porcelain clay is just hard to work with.  it takes practice, patients
and knowledge of timing.  it is slow to work with.

sushi plates are often a slab system pot.  i sure would not throw a
sushi platter...i would roll out the clay, cut it into a rectangle and
make a slight roll to it, and add four feet, or a cross slab lift system.
let the bottom of the slab rest on the table and leave it unglazed.
it would take 15 minutes to make a nice platter...and it would fire
like a dream.
why fight the system.  let the clay do what it wants.
it makes the fight much easier.
mel